Work Stress & Self-Care

Jess Welch, Wellness Coordinator

How does one cope with too much work, little help, and no time to do their mounting tasks? Through coaching I consistently hear employees tell me about low job satisfaction. Work is their number one source of stress in their life and carries out into other areas leading to low life-satisfaction.

“I have no time to work out.”

“If I had one word to describe my eating habits it would be ‘quick’.”

“Work is constantly on my mind, distracting me from time with my family.”

“I blink and my entire day is gone.”

And as much as a simple answer could be to quit their jobs, it isn’t so simple after all. Everyone has bills to pay, relationships they have made within the workplace, and face the risk of starting over while many may enjoy large pieces of their jobs. So we have this complex issue of increased stress leading to increased risk factors for things like cardiovascular disease, decreased fulfillment, and no real answer to fix it due to life’s high demands.

Because this blog is not for my recommendations of the complex situation for employers to aide in creating a lower stress environment for their employees, I am going to focus on you: the workers. How do you keep up with life’s high demands inside and outside the workplace? How do you develop healthy habits and keep a job you may have worked quite hard to obtain?

Developing healthy coping strategies takes cognitive effort. If it were something you could do outside of cognitive thought, you probably would have been doing it already. As a species, we run as efficiently as possible already but unfortunately this is a piece we still have to think about. However, once we develop the strategies needed for self-care, it becomes less necessary to be intentional about it and more habitual.

Now, I break up stress into two separate categories: the first being that immediate stress, the “here and now” stress, the “my chest hurts and my head is spinning” stress. The second being that mounting and constant stress, like a consistent dull noise in the back of your head. Below you will see some ideas to help cope with each type.

The immediate stress:

  • Remove yourself from the situation for five minutes
  • Close your eyes and take 3 slow breaths: 7 seconds in, 10 seconds out.
  • Plug in your music and listen to one song you love
  • Get a stress ball

*Try these and go right back to work.

The consistent stress:

  • Go for a walk, exercise
  • Get enough sleep
  • Limit Caffeine intake
  • Do something you enjoy; volunteer, read a book, etc.

Coping with the consistent stress helps decrease the times of that “immediate stress” feeling. So developing a good self-care plan will lower those intense feelings. Now, you’re probably thinking – “Jess, if I have time I would have already been doing this! This doesn’t answer my question at all.” My answer? Find five minutes in your day. Then find ten. Increase your moments of self-care by five minutes a week until you can somehow find 20-30 minutes in your day. This does not need to be all at once, scatter it if you need to. But I promise, once you do you will not regret it! Your physical body, your emotional body, heck – even your work will all thank you!

Well Leaders: Involving the Right People

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 Toni Sperlbaum, CWWPM, CHWC, Vice President of Sales & Marketing

When a company implements a wellness program, many program administrators are very used to hearing that the promotion and support for this program needs to come from the top down in order for it to be successful.  While this is true, it’s not the entire story.  Each culture and logistics of the company has a role in how this plays out, but who could be more important than your CEO, CFO, HR team, and other key executives?  Middle Management.

If your CEO sends a letter home to employees encouraging their participation, their message is in your newsletter and on a flyer in the break room, that’s great.  But how much time do your employees actually spend with the CEO?  What is their level of trust of your CEO (another topic out of my expertise!)?  While in a perfect corporate world, the answers here would be “a lot of time!” and “a lot of trust!”, it’s just not reality.  Employees are spending a majority of their time in their own departments with their direct supervisors.  If those middle managers are not buying in to the program, neither will their employees!

We encourage you to host separate meetings with your management team, even one-on-one perhaps, to get their buy in and almost most importantly, their commitment to participating themselves.  Setting the example is half of the message!  Consider running special challenges or programs just for them.  Highlighting in a newsletter “Healthy Leaders” and showing what they have accomplished, or the results of your WellLeader Challenge.  Communication is also huge.  In many companies, the main route of communicating all of the fantastic programs you have going simply aren’t reaching all employees.  Your middle managers are the key.

January is National Oatmeal Month

  Jamal Mack, BS, Wellness Coordinator

According to the USDA, only 44% of Americans eat breakfast daily which means more than half of the population are not indulging in the proper morning maintenance of their bodies. Out of those 44% who do eat breakfast, 73% eat some type of sweetened cereal once or more for breakfast a week. Breakfast is the first meal of the day, setting the tone for your daily societal adventures. With that being said, we want to ensure that we are putting the right fuel in our bodies upon our awakening. Since January is National Oatmeal Month, what better way to start your January breakfast off than with the Quaker man himself? Oatmeal is a great way to enjoy a breakfast and due to its lack of (for lack of a better term) “potent” flavor there are a myriad of possibilities when it comes to adding to that flavor.

Quick Quaker Tips

  • Add a fruit : bananas, apple slices, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, mangos, pineapples, and/ or peaches are good ways to add some extra flavor AND some extra nutrients into your breakfast treat
  • Add a natural sweetener: Honey, agave, and/or peanut butter are great natural sweeteners you can add to your oatmeal (can combine with fruit as well) to make that road from mouth to stomach a bit more pleasant
  • Experiment with different ingredients: Instead of regular oatmeal try flax meal, flax and quinoa meal, and/or steel cut oats. All of which taste a little different and are accompanied by some extra nutritional tools (omega-3s in quinoa/flax mix, fiber in steel cut oats, etc..)
  • Eat while fresh and hot: As tedious as this tip may seem you’d be surprised how a quick drop in temperature can sway the flavor of your oatmeal, it is best to eat it while still hot

For more interesting and TASTY ways to have your oats and oatmeal visit

http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/meal-ideas/10-new-ways-eat-oatmeal

Now that we know are better aware of how to improve our oatmeal’s taste, I think it is imperative to keep in mind the “why” behind all this which is that we want to feel and be healthier each day. Starting off your morning with oatmeal has some great health benefits such as:

  • Weight loss- Oatmeal contains beta-glucan which helps promote to release of the peptide YY hormone. This hormone may help you lose weight by making you feel more full. It does this by slowing down the emptying of the stomach.
  • Blood sugar control- Oatmeal’s soluble fiber beta-glucan, may improve insulin sensitivity and help lower blood sugar levels by forming a thick gel that delays emptying of the stomach and absorption of glucose into the blood
  • Cholesterol control- Once again that soluble super fiber beta-glucan has numerous benefits. It helps reduce blood cholesterol and sugar levels by promoting healthy gut bacteria and increasing feelings of fullness
  • Improved Skin- Finely cut oats aka colloidal oatmeal has historically been used to help treat dry and itchy skin and even helps treat symptoms of various skin conditions, such as eczema
  • Reduced risk of childhood asthma- A recent study found a link between oats and asthma in children under the age of 6 months
  • Relieve of constipation- With oatmeal being so fiber rich its no wonder this super food can assist with eliminating constipation

These are only brief descriptions of how/why oatmeal is so beneficial for us. For more information you may seek out information on

https://authoritynutrition.com/9-benefits-oats-oatmeal/

Well there you have it! HAPPY OATMEAL MONTH!!!! Now go celebrate with a bowl of the Quakers finest!